Articles, Blog

Every Face Tells A Story | The Language of Cinema


78 Comments

  1. JimmyDThing Author

    I like your video essays, but I disagree with this one. You start off asking what it is that film does that other mediums don't but this is pointing out something that all portraits do. Whether they are paintings or photographs. The power of film is the MOVING camera. What it has over photography is that it shows movement. What it has over theater is a 2 dimensional stage turns into a 3 dimensional world where the audience can move throughout the "stage". What it has over novels is the same.

    Reply
  2. mcollier 1 Author

    Great video. One of my favourite examples of this also features Michael Fassbender, in Inglorious Basterds. His character is told ''the two of us aren't going anywhere.'' in the bar scene, and you see the reality of the situation (that he is going to die momentarily) dawn on him in the slight flicker of Fassbender's eyes. Moments later his bravado is back and his guard up again, referring to the situation as a ''pickle''.

    Reply
  3. luis sandoval Author

    Nice Work. We need more channels like this, but also we need spanish subtitles. My english is not very good and i need to read all what you saying in the video to understand it. Well, isn't like i can't understand your video but i lost in some lines.

    *this coment was edit by google translate.

    Reply
  4. Do I Know You Author

    I really hate the opening and closing scenes of Shame. Nothing in Fassbender's performance suggests flirting or desire. Literally a random gloomy stranger stares at her on the tube and she starts seriously considering sex with him. Don't buy that for a second.

    Reply
  5. Living Abstraction Author

    Wonderful video. I honestly found some interesting examples of the same Facial storytelling in Batman v Superman of all movies. In certain scenes in the film you get a great sense of character understanding through the faces Henry Cavill, Ben Affleck, and Amy Adams make.

    Reply
  6. Zack Zavage Author

    I have watched Shame just recently and was so very impressed by how Steve McQueen manages convey so much story through mere facial expressions and with so little dialogue. That subway-scene in particular was the one that impressed me the most, so much that I even watched the scene two times more after the movie ended.

    Reply
  7. Conor Matchett Author

    Space Odyssey is another fantastic example of story telling using faces, there is so little dialogue and yet the story never suffers. Watched all your videos in the space of two days, and subbed, keep up the good work!

    Reply
  8. Martin Nazario Author

    by any chance has anyone seen "La jetee" it wouldve fit perfectly in this video essay. the entire movie is still photographs, just sound and dialogue in the background except for 1 scene in which there is brief yet impactful movement.

    Reply
  9. Martin Nazario Author

    by any chance has anyone seen "La jetee" it wouldve fit perfectly in this video essay. the entire movie is still photographs, just sound and dialogue in the background except for 1 scene in which there is brief yet impactful movement.

    Reply
  10. Riversaur Author

    I usually hate long takes of a still camera and still actor, because they feel pretentious and also they're mostly boring but I remember that close up in 12 Years a Slave really stuck with me, the first thing I mentioned to my girlfriend while leave the cinema was that close up.

    Reply
  11. BrandonHouseART Author

    What about comic books? Don't laugh it off, I'm serious. Matching panels are very similar to storyboards and they can tell a similar story with a similar weight

    Reply
  12. jake michael Author

    yeah, but you forgot the medium of graphic novels, which i think holds the same advantage. I was thinking the same ting about faces today whilst reading one of them.

    Reply
  13. TheSgtkite Author

    Kind of an odd statement that it's the faces of actors that make film unique. What about photography, or portraiture in general? What about stage performance? I'd think if there was one element that is really unique and groundbreaking that cinema owns, it's editing.

    Reply
  14. Jeremy Max Author

    I absolutely love your videos. I go to NYU Tisch. Your videos have really inspired me keep up the good work. If you have the time maybe check out one of my films and contentiously rip them apart! Hahaha.

    Reply
  15. Ilan Erez Author

    Great video! Totally agree with your Steve McQueen examples. Both great films and great performances.

    I feel like part of this too, which you touch on w/ your 12 years a slave example, is knowing when to use this sort of moment. As you said, this moment works so well bc of it's context within the story.

    Another great example of this is the long cu in Boogie Nights during the "Jessie's Girl" scene.

    Really, well done! Every video of yours I've seen has been fantastic!

    Reply
  16. Jake H. Guy Author

    I'm a little late to the game seeing this (was perusing your videos and you've got some good ones) but I would say the main factor that makes film different is that it is in an element of time: just like music. Graphic Novels and books are sequential but not necessarily in time because the audience can go at their own pace. There are many great graphic novelist that painstakingly craft an expression on a face and changes between them (which end up being a series of images) to convey emotion and important messages of the art. What's cool about film is that we can see an expression going through that in real time. Good video and I definitely learned more about conveying story through an actors face. Can't wait to employ it in a film.

    Reply
  17. Alejandro R. Planas Author

    Videogames also hold this perk, our medium is only 40 years old though, so it hasn't been demonstrated as well, but L.A. Noire does try to take a similar approach at it's episodic storytelling.

    This can all be refined, and once I am allowed to do it, I will try to take all the lessons from cinema to the forefront of games, combining them with Game Design, but this can all be achieved by games as well. It is just a matter of time.

    Reply
  18. Alejandro R. Planas Author

    Videogames also hold this perk, our medium is only 40 years old though, so it hasn't been demonstrated as well, but L.A. Noire does try to take a similar approach at it's episodic storytelling.

    This can all be refined, and once I am allowed to do it, I will try to take all the lessons from cinema to the forefront of games, combining them with Game Design, but this can all be achieved by games as well. It is just a matter of time.

    Reply
  19. Fefedefefessle Author

    People have raised the idea of comics, and that's fair.
    I'd argue, though, that a lot of mixed media can do this quite well, as cinema is not exclusive to, well, cinema. Video games, cartoons, animated comics, they all use the same principles in a simulated cinema, while still ostensibly being considered separate. I realise it's something of a trite distinction, but media is pretty muddied nowadays, and it would be a shame to assume that traditional cinema is the sole owner of this advantage.

    Reply
  20. Charlie Brownlee Author

    Comics can't do this either. If The Graduate were a graphic novel, you would read it, look at their faces, and close the book. But in a movie, you have to watch Benjamin and Elaine feel that moment of regret whether you want to or not. Film can drag a scene out to make the effect greater, or not.

    Reply
  21. pierp Author

    what about comics!!!! seriously, i see so many comics that capture exactly this, subtle expressions of character's faces. maybe not many do it, but comics are capable of these kinds of emotions and any great comic artist can express these sorts of emotions with that medium

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *