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Hidden Meaning in Batman: The Dark Knight– Earthling Cinema


Greetings, and welcome to Earthling
Cinema. I am your host, Garyx Wormuloid. This week’s artifact is
The Dark Knight, co-written by visionary auteur Jonathan Nolan and
directed by his brother. The Dark Knight tells the story of
Bruce Wayne, a run-of-the-mill billionaire playboy who suffers
from a brain disease that makes him pretend to be a rodent. Which is
good, because he lives in the most mentally disturbed city in America.
Wayne uses his limitless wealth to buy expensive armor, then goes
around punching lots of people who aren’t wearing any armor, such as
Baghead, these mob guys and an unemployed clown named
the Joker. The Joker decides he wants to get
to know this “Bat-man” a little better, so he offers to not kill a
bunch of people in exchange for Batman’s identity. Batman catches him
instead, but not before the Joker sets up a tasty little trap.
District Attorney Harvey Dent and perennial love interest Rachel
Dawes are locked in two different rooms filled with barrels, which
are deadly to humans. Rachel is killed and Dent changes his name to
Two-Face, even though Half-Face is probably more accurate.
The Joker escapes, and Batman uses his Bluetooth to track him down and
finally spend some quality time together. Two-Face starts throwing a hissy fit,
so Batman silences him with a big hug, then takes the blame for everything and goes on a much needed vacation. The Dark Knight is a film permeated by duality. Batman (a.k.a. the Dark Knight)
yearns for a world where he can be replaced by Harvey
Dent, the White Knight. Except in Rachel’s bed, that is. When Dent
becomes Two-Face, he embodies this duality, from the two sides of his
face to the two sides of his coin to his two perfectly intact
eyeballs that never dry out, even with prolonged exposure to air. Another duality is order versus chaos. “Chaos.” The Joker seeks to show the people of Gotham that underneath the facade of an
orderly society is existential anarchy. Kind of like how underneath my eyebrows is another, crazier set of eyebrows. The Joker is a nihilist, one who believes in nothing, not even the
concept of nihilism. When asked directly “WHAT DO YOU ALL BELIVE IN?!” … the Joker’s response is meaningless. “Whatever doesn’t kill you simply makes you stranger.” So too is the grenade he puts in the manager’s mouth. It’s just an empty scare tactic that emits a floral perfume. My guess is
Chanel number 5000. The Joker offers several different stories
about the source of his scars … But they are all lies. It doesn’t
matter how he got the scars. The Joker jokes because everything is
trivial. But unlike this picture of a cat on
a skateboard, the Joker’s terrorist acts aren’t random. They try to
prove a point: morality is a sham. Take away humans’ physical comforts
or safety and they will turn into wild animals. Not literally, like we can. I’m talking metaphors here. The Joker exploits the innate, base lawlessness of humanity. “Their code, it’s a bad joke.” The Joker has the bank robbers kill each other in order to increase their
share of the loot. He gives three “friends” a weapon, telling them
whoever survives gets to join his team. He threatens to blow up
hospitals if people don’t do his bidding – causing cops to turn corrupt and citizens to attempt murder. Pretty good for a guy who
can’t even put on his makeup correctly. The Joker’s pièce de résistance, pardon my French, is the corruption
of District Attorney Harvey Dent. Harvey’s double-sided coin
represents his rigid adherence to the ideas of justice, morality, and
order, not to mention his firm commitment to the U.S. Mint. He
leaves nothing to chance, “I make my own luck.” But after he becomes
Two-Face, the coin is scarred on one side, turning it into a regular
coin: 50/50. Or if you’re really good at coin-flipping, 60/60. Just
like the coin, Dent has been infected by the Joker’s vision – a
reality ruled only by cosmic anarchy. “The only morality in a cruel world is chance.” At the beginning of the film, Dent is a Christ figure whose campaign slogan has religious connotations: “I believe in Harvey
Dent.” But whereas most films use Christ
imagery to suggest that the character has sacrificed himself
for an ideal, or for the good of humanity, The Dark Knight shows us
a daring and modern interpretation of the Christ image. It shows a Christ without resurrection. In other words, just
a dead dude with a righteous beard. A false Ideal, but one that must be
upheld as a beacon of hope for mankind. Batman takes it upon
himself to uphold that facade … thus maintaining order.
But unlike Dent, who represents order through idealism, Batman
represents order through force. He is a fascist —
like my father-in-law — a necessary evil to tame the beastly
side of mankind. As the ferry scene
proves, the democratic method is not enough. A simple vote would
have them do the amoral thing – destroying the other boat to ensure
their survival. “140 against, 396 for.” It takes tyrannical power to ultimately uphold justice. which is why Gerald Ford kept being elected president. When Bat-man creates the sonar machine, it is a tremendous violation of privacy, bordering on morally bankrupt. But as Alfred
tells him, sometimes the only way to catch a jewel thief is to “burn
the forest down.” “We burn the forest down.” For Earthling Cinema, I’m Garyx Wormuloid. To apprehend the world’s most dangerous criminals, click the subscribe button.

100 Comments

  1. Fay Goodwin Author

    Chanel 5000, classic! Love it! Seriously Sir, hats and galaxies off to you for your witty videos! And in respect to this video in particular of course, bless the wonderful Mr Ledger for his superb acting, he is one Earthling greatly missed, floating about up there in the cosmos.

    Reply
  2. Smo Cloud Author

    As much as I wish I had a suggestion for what to do next I'm only here to comment on the fact that this dude must have 5 different sets of eyebrows cause these are way bigger than the ones from the Batman begins episode.

    Reply
  3. Angel Luna Author

    2:12 you were wrong about Jokers first response having no meaning

    "I believe in whatever doesn't kill you simply makes you stranger"

    Rather than stronger the joker genuinely believes that the more traumatic things you are exposed to tend to make you more mentally ill rather than stronger which can be true in a lot of cases. How many veterans suffer from ptsd ALOT

    Reply
  4. Bat Man Author

    As time passes the Joker and Batman become similar batman adopts the Joker's nihilistic views on life/becomes more flexible in the chaos of Gotham's atmosphere and his quest to seek justice. The jokers insanity slowly becomes more organized his plans executed as flawlessly as batmans becoming more of a rational choice to destroy and cause chaos simply for the fun of it. But both are trying to escape the reality of their situation Batman by Clinging to a Traumatic event in his life as his guiding force."preventing him from directly killing"And Joker by blaming the world for his misery seeing everything as a big fucking joke and wanting to "humble" people into accepting the Chaos.seen in comics like the killing joke, A death in the family, the dark knight returns.the issue where Damian "was killed".Batman and Joker are both insaneYet although their persona's stemm from Trauma. Their choices and conclusion's come from rational thought processes people compare them to a ying yang relationship but really it's more a matter of perception like a shadow if you turn the lights off its all a shadow if the room were fully illuminated it would all be light. But they're reflection's of what they could have been if circumstances changed.Batman knows killing Joker is the only way to end his misery but he won't because his Trauma is his only driving force. And Joker won't stop laughing because if he did all he'd do is cry and probably kill himself. "Like he did in dark knight returns".In its coreBatman is a highly philosophical work Analyzing the human condition in Cities like Gotham,moral absolutism vs absurdism eventually they both become utilitarian's with a limiting factor their insanity.

    Reply
  5. Keya Gupta Author

    what I really like about the dark knight is Harvey dents character wonder why nobody addresses him. he is more relatable than the other two.if batman and joker represents ideals of chaos and order then Harvey and Gordon represents the general public. Harvey is that dynamic white knight who is forced to take a evil stand because of corruption by the pain of losing a loved one .in this regard Harvey can be compared with gone from the anime hunter x hunter.BTW love the part where garex says ("and he goes around punching guys without armour")

    Reply
  6. Keya Gupta Author

    what I really like about the dark knight is Harvey dents character wonder why nobody addresses him. he is more relatable than the other two.if batman and joker represents ideals of chaos and order then Harvey and Gordon represents the general public. Harvey is that dynamic white knight who is forced to take a evil stand because of corruption by the pain of losing a loved one .in this regard Harvey can be compared with gone from the anime hunter x hunter.BTW love the part where garex says ("and he goes around punching guys without armour")

    Reply
  7. Keya Gupta Author

    what I really like about the dark knight is Harvey dents character wonder why nobody addresses him. he is more relatable than the other two.if batman and joker represents ideals of chaos and order then Harvey and Gordon represents the general public. Harvey is that dynamic white knight who is forced to take a evil stand because of corruption by the pain of losing a loved one .in this regard Harvey can be compared with gone from the anime hunter x hunter.BTW love the part where garex says ("and he goes around punching guys without armour")

    Reply
  8. Keya Gupta Author

    what I really like about the dark knight is Harvey dents character wonder why nobody addresses him. he is more relatable than the other two.if batman and joker represents ideals of chaos and order then Harvey and Gordon represents the general public. Harvey is that dynamic white knight who is forced to take a evil stand because of corruption by the pain of losing a loved one .in this regard Harvey can be compared with gone from the anime hunter x hunter.BTW love the part where garex says ("and he goes around punching guys without armour")

    Reply
  9. Keya Gupta Author

    what I really like about the dark knight is Harvey dents character wonder why nobody addresses him. he is more relatable than the other two.if batman and joker represents ideals of chaos and order then Harvey and Gordon represents the general public. Harvey is that dynamic white knight who is forced to take a evil stand because of corruption by the pain of losing a loved one .in this regard Harvey can be compared with gone from the anime hunter x hunter.BTW love the part where garex says ("and he goes around punching guys without armour")

    Reply
  10. Money Cat Author

    The idea that order is so easily driven to pure chaos by a simple kick to "the plan" is seen most obviously during Commissioner Loeb's funeral. Everyone is organized into rows and the whole event is so thoroughly rehearsed, but the moment the Joker shoots Gordon, everyone scatters.

    Reply
  11. ESPSAlita Author

    What's really bizarre is how people keep trying to insert some deeper meaning into the character of the Joker in this film. Practically all he does is this movie is show over and over again that human beings are ultimately animals controlled by a series of basic cognitive patterns that compel them to behave in their own self-interest primarily. Why he isn't necessary 100% right in saying this, he is at least half right in the sense that, unless a conscious effort is made to acknowledge these patterns and make an attempt to grow beyond them, those patterns will be the only thing that defines humanity. Both Christopher Nolan and his fans' attempts to "explain" this film really do baffle me. I'm not sure if there's anything particularly profound about this film at all. It seems to be mainly Batman punching people over and over again and the Joker giving people a chance to unleash their inner "asshole".

    Reply
  12. Markus-Hermann Koch Author

    Love these old earth movies, thanks for keeping them around. still: while indeed quite nihilist the jokers statement at 2:02 is far from nonsensical. it is a bit of self-pity taken from earth anti theologist nietzsche, who stated, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. the joker is delivering in one line that violence applied to him made him what he is, more violence will make him even more so, and violence won't break him, if he endures it at all. also that concept might be applied to others, plus strangeness equals power. Just my two smart assical credits…

    Reply
  13. John Martin Author

    You know they called Batman a fascist in the Dark Knight Returns comic as well. And yeah he does take the law into his own hands on occasion, but he is willing to work with the police as opposed to just fighting against them. Even allying himself with the Police Commissioner and the DA. And even when he creates the Bat Cam Computer he puts in the hands of someone else. It's not really till the end where he can be considered that, as well as the first half of DKR. But that's all part of his arc, to realize that he can't control everything and that the "greater good" shouldn't get in the way of what's right.

    Reply
  14. Vighnesh Bilgi Author

    Before I complete the video , I just Wanna guess that the meaning of the movie calls out the hypocrisy between the people and it's government.

    *After the video * Meh. In the ball park.

    Reply
  15. immanence Author

    4:14 The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb is an oil and tempera on limewood painting created by the German artist and printmaker Hans Holbein the Younger between 1520–22.

    Reply
  16. Justafan IV Author

    I love how you use Gerald Ford as the name of guy who kept being elected president when in fact he's the only president to have never been elected to the executive branch

    Reply
  17. John Lewis Author

    I see the democratic process is the wall that ultimately stops justice. Therefore, if justice is to be served, it can only be so if we impose an autocracy. All Hail Batman, the believer of the system that works for the system outside the system because the system will not bring justice whatsoever.

    Reply

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